About the Health Warriors Network

About the Network

The Network means to aid learners in charting a career pathway by doing some of this work for them. The Network will afford learners the opportunity to create their own career pathway. This career pathway function showcases various and alternative career options in the field of health; outlines the educational achievements that are required to attain that goal; provide links to the schools, programs; and upgrading opportunities that offer the appropriate accreditation.

The health career planning supports also shows the courses and prerequisites that are required for entrance into these programs. This career pathway function supports, and is strongly supported by, our partners in this project; namely, the Amiskwaciy Academy, the Edmonton Public Schools' Skill Centre. As the site becomes popular, it is expected that this function will be used by schools across Alberta.

In terms of Network users, the Health Warriors Network is a virtual community that fosters dialogue, debate, and discussion amongst a variety of stakeholders on issues related to Aboriginal health and well-being, Aboriginal education, career pathways planning, school transitioning, the reality of urban and/or rural living, and a host of other social topics. Additionally, through this community, we hope to foster relationships and partnerships between First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities in Alberta and elsewhere. Specifically, since the Network is not bound by geographic space, there is great potential to reach and link First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples in both urban and rural settings.

As a community, the Health Warriors Network encourages dialogue, discussion, and debate between Aboriginal people of different age, social, and/or professional backgrounds. An important demographic is younger, Aboriginal learners aged 9-13 who are forming career aspirations. We plan to reach this group by linking with elementary teachers and creating engaging, age appropriate learning activities on the site.

The second target demographic is Aboriginal persons ages 14-19. Our strategy of reaching this group is to link with secondary teachers and the Skills Centre and to create engaging, age appropriate learning activities, which include film documentaries (where students become the producers, directors, and stars of the film) and an online game (to be developed in later project stages).

The third target demographic is Aboriginal persons ages 20-35 who are transitioning or have transitioned into a post-secondary health program and/or health career. We plan to reach this group by linking with post-secondary institutions and learning centres in Alberta and by offering this group the resources, support systems, and social networking space they have expressly requested.

Finally, the fourth target demographic is elders, community leaders, and aboriginal health professionals who we look to provide the wisdom, direction, support, and role models for youth.